Macaroni Cheese Lover (cheekily vegan!)

Super easy Vegan Macaroni and Cheese

Ingredients- Serves 1

100g Macaroni (or other similar sized pasta)

1 large fresh broccoli or cauliflower sliced

1 whole tinned butter beans with water, puréed

Hard vegan cheese, grated

Mixed dried oregano and thyme, to taste

Salt and pepper, to taste

Method

  • Cook pasta in salted boiling water (see pasta package for approx. cooking time)

Whilst pasta is cooking

  • Sauté garlic until fragrant and brown tinged
  • Add puréed butter beans
  • Add herbs
  • Add grated cheese, vegan or dairy
  • Add salt/pepper to taste
  • Mix until heated through
  • Drain pasta when it is to your preference of cooked, add the sauce
  • Put in a bowl and add fresh sliced broccoli and extra grated cheese
  • Grill, or eat as is

I add chilli powder or flakes for an extra kick

Learning to Stir Fry

Ingredients 

  • A medium piece of Salmon (chopped) (from Mikey’s Plaice
  • 1/2 red onion (chopped)
  • 3 pak choi florets (chopped)
  • Rapeseed oil (for frying)
  • 2 medium-sized roti 
  • 2 tbs spicy paprika*
  • 1 tbs cumin seeds*
  • 2 tbs Worcestershire sauce*
  • 2 tbs dark soy sauce*
  • 1 lemon (rind)*
  • Coriander*                                                       *Or to taste

Method

  1. Heat the oil in a pan
  2. Fry the onion with the cumin seeds and spicy paprika 
  3. Once the onions have softened slightly, add the salmon and mix throughly to coat it with the spices
  4. The length of time you cook the salmon depends on your preference, approximately 3-5 minutes
  5. Tear the roti roughly into strips and add into the pan
  6. Add the Worcestershire sauce and dark soy sauce
  7. Add the pak choi and coriander
  8. Grate the lemon into the pan to get the rind 
  9. Stir through to make sure all the ingredients are nicely mixed

Jom Makan!

Love and peace always, 

Giselda x

50 Shades of Autumn – warming Butternut and Carrot curry

Ingredients – Serves 2

2 x Garlic Clove

1 x Small Red Onion

1 1/2 in Fresh Ginger

1 x Small Butternut Squash

1 x Medium Carrot

200g Organic Plain Tofu

1tsp Cumin Seeds

1/2tsp Turmeric Powder

1 large pinch Dried Curry Leaves

2x Tbsp Spicy Paprika – please use less or a non spicy paprika if spicy not enjoyed

2x Tbsp Tomato Puree

2 Cups of Water – or more if needed to cook butternut

Rapeseed Oil

Method

  1. Roughly chop onion, ginger and garlic
  2. Remove skin of butternut squash, scrape out seeds and cut into small cubes
  3. Heat pan and pour a generous glug of rapeseed oil
  4. Add chopped onion, garlic and ginger.  Fry till slightly coloured.
  5. Add cumin seeds, turmeric, handful of dried curry leaves (optional).
  6. Add paprika
  7. Add butternut squash and stir to coat in oil and spices
  8. Add tomato puree and water.
  9. Add salt and cover with a lid and leave to simmer gently till butternut squash is soft
  10. If water evaporates, add more and stir occasionally
  11. When squash is cooked, grate carrot, crumble tofu and add frozen peas
  12. Stir till all warmed through and take off heat
  13. Serve with roti or grain of choice

Oodles of Noodles Kanada-Ya, St Giles London

So 3 friends went off to the big city on the train to search for a very little Japanese restaurant filled with oodles of noodles! (Ramen to be precise.)

We queueProcessed with VSCO with f2 presetd in anticipation with several other Japanese people (always a good sign) and a couple of Americans.  The restaurant opened its doors at exactly 12 noon and we were told where to sit.  The restaurant sat 20.   They only served you if you were physically present.  So no pre-ordering for late friends!

Orders were taken promptly.  I sat sipping on my green tea with roasted rice whilst waiting for my food.   The food arrived swiftly and perfectly cooked.

Our starters were chicken karaage with Japanese mayo and BBQ pork with a chilli sauce.

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The 3 of us sat in sublime silence enjoying every bite of our chicken and BBQ pork.

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Then the steaming hot bowls of  pork ramen arrived.  We were recommended the ‘hard’ ramen option as the noodles settled into their right texture as we ate.  Ching had ordered ‘regular’ and her noodles became too soft.  My soup was spiced and the other two not.  We all three ordered a boiled egg as the added extra.  A good choice, the egg was delicious.

I alternately added thinly julienned ginger or spicy pickled vegetables to my spoonfuls of ramen.    These were ‘free’ to help ourselves on the table.  I love different textures and flavours and wasn’t disappointed.

The whole experience was definitely to be repeated.  Perhaps with Elise and Tara.  Maya might be enticed with the crunchy fried chicken but ramen nor pork a favourite.

Their complete menu is available online.

 

 

 

 

Of Rotis and Doves

I want to share my Roti recipe, with a nutritional twist.  I used Doves Farm organic wholemeal Buckwheat flour and Psyllium husks.

The humble Roti, a nutritious flat bread, eaten in many countries, known by different names.  A basic filling food that is cheap on ingredients and deeply satisfying to make.  I enjoy the ritual of squidging the dough, rolling it out and cooking it on a hot plate.  The rolling out in a circle and ‘air bubbles’ when cooking, a challenge for me as a child,   I still don’t roll them out in a proper circle but hey! I think I have mastered the ‘air bubbles’:)

We traditionally made them with ‘atta’ (fine wholewheat) flour.  I have been experimenting with the wonderful range from Doves Farm.

I met Clare Marriage 10 years ago, when I ran my food business in Wiltshire.  We were both members of Slow Food Berkshire.

I love that the business is family run and very socially conscious.  I have had much pleasure helping them at their “Free From’ exhibition stalls in London Olympia, Liverpool, Glasgow and their ‘Children in need’ charity tent at Car Fest, Hampshire.

I used their organic flour at my organic cafe in Kuala Lumpur,  their gluten free range of flours, pasta, bars and biscuit unbeatable on flavour and quality.  It’s lovely to have access to their full range here in the UK.


Giselda’s Fibre rich Roti

Ingredients

500g Doves Farm organic wholemeal Buckwheat flour
1tbsp Psyllium husks
3tbsp Olive oil
2 large pinches of salt to taste
3 cups boiling water

Method

Mix flour and Psyllium husks in a large (roomy) bowl.  Add olive oil and salt.  Add boiling hot water and mix with spatula in a slicing motion.

Once the dough is cooled to touch, gather dough and form into a ball.  Take ball out of bowl and work on a floured surface.  Dough should be soft and elastic.

Roll into ping pong ball sized pieces and press down flat using palm of your hand.  Then roll out thinly.

I generally roll out a piece while the other is cooking.  This is a great opportunity to get your child (partner, friend, neighbour) to help.  I often chat with my girls about their day while we bond making Roti.

Cook on a hot flat pan.  Keep warm on a plate under a tea towel.

We eat them with curry.

They were also popular at our organic cafe filled with cheese, mashed avocado, tuna, etc and toast on a hot flat frying pan, recipe to follow.


A ‘Midlife Growth’ !

No more ‘Midlife crises’ 🙂

Giselda’s Food is officially open for business.

Many months spent working on recipes and menus.  Lots of food tastings with my girls and close friends.  Lazy Sunday lunches and midweek surprises.

My food journey started many years ago in Malaysia.  I grew up in a family of food lovers.  Travelling many miles with my father to try the best bowl of Shitake mushroom Bah Kut Teh (a delicious herbal Chinese soup).

My mother always carrying a rice cooker on trips to the beach and cooking the most amazing food in our little hotel room (back in the days when one could smuggle appliances into hotels!)

Sitting with my grandmother and stirring chopped up pieces of banana core in a pan of water to gather the stringy bits.

Aunty Susan producing mouth watering meals with the simplest store cupboard ingredients.

Then travelling and living in many different countries and learning different cultures through food.